Latest Review

Reviews are great.

All reviews. Even that one-star trouncing that makes you feel like roadkill.

Yes, even those are great.

Because it means folks are reading your book. And above all else, writers and editors love to know our work is being read.

So when a nice review comes in, it’s like making it to the stars. No matter how few copies a book has sold, a five-star review makes all the hard work worth it.

In the anthology “You Are Here,” N.E. White has assembled a fine collection of medium-length stories having a single common theme: maps. Their only other trait in common is excellence. Ranging from cartographic communication between plants to travels in time, space, or the mind — these tales prove that the Golden Age of Science Fiction and Fantasy might just prove to be right now.

I picked this book up as a download on Nook, but you may want a paper-and-ink copy. The stories are keepers. I’ve come across several of authors before: Charlotte Ashley, Andrew Leon Hudson, Daniel Ausema, and Wilson Geiger — but I’m equally impressed with those I’ve never before encountered. ~ Kopacetik, a Barnes and Noble customer

We hadn’t planned to sell print copies, but maybe we’ll revisit the idea and consider it.

If you’d like to read these “keepers”, the e-book is available at these online locations:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes

An Opportunity to Give

You Are Here‘s special donation pricing has ended. During the holiday season, we managed to sell over 400 copies of the anthology.

While the sale figures represent a modest accomplishment, we’re not complaining! We are happy to see our cartographic collection sell. In addition, the anthology has managed to garner positive reviews on Amazon (US).

As promised, we will be donating the initial proceeds ($400.00 after minor expenses deducted) to the Humane Society of the United States in honor of Lindsay Buroker, our featured author. We hope our contribution to the welfare of animals goes far.

Though buying a copy of You Are Here will no longer support our furry companions, you can still get a copy! We promise you won’t be disappointed in the breath and diversity of our stories.

Enjoy.

Buy your copy today at these fine (online) venues:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes

Daniel Ausema

This is the last of our short interviews with our contributing authors. Thanks again to everyone who participated in SFFWorld.com’s 2017 anthology. We couldn’t have done it without you all!

Without further ado, meet…

Daniel Ausema

What inspired you to write a story about a map?

I’ve always been intrigued by maps. There’s a story in every line of a map, a narrative implied. In fact, when I begin daydreaming about a new long form story I want to write, all the world-building and plotting is often highly tentative…until I sit down and draw a map. That’s when the world begins to take shape in my mind, and the map itself suggests new twists and turns of the story. For this specific story, I wanted to have it take place in the same general region as the story I had in last year’s SFFWorld.com anthology, Ecotones: “Seeds by a Hurricane Torn.” Plant-based magic infuses that setting, so the pairing of that with my interest in maps and my love of the weird and strange out there led to this story.

Do you have a special place where you go to recharge your creative muse?

I live beside the mountains. Being up–anywhere–in the mountains is a huge boost for something inside me. To be honest, though, as a parent of young children, I don’t get nearly as much time to spend up there as I might like. Yet even being able to see the peaks as I drive my kids to school or rush around on errands has a similar calming effect on the chaos, which is key for creativity. I grew up far from the mountains, and back there, it was the stands of old growth trees that did it for me. Wandering in them, or even simply taking them in as I passed by, was a map to creativity for me.

Can you tell us about a time when you wished you had a map?

When I was a freshman in college, I was in a city I’d driven to and through all my life, but didn’t really grasp how one area I knew met up with another. I was preparing for my first collegiate track season–and was under-prepared compared to many of my teammates. So when we headed out for a run, I fell behind and ended up deciding I had to simply turn back early–a five-mile run instead of the six or seven miles the others were doing.
I got turned around.
After realizing I was lost, I asked someone for help as she was getting into her car in front of her house. Except…I hadn’t learned the street names of my college yet and could only tell her the college name, so she directed me to where the campus had been decades earlier. Which got me even more turned around. When I finally got back to my dorm, I looked on a map (!) and calculated that I must have gone twenty miles by the time all was done. Not all of it running…

For your story, Mapping the Buzz of Insects, you created a unique world that feels much fuller than this one short story. Do you have anything else written in this story-world?

In addition to the Ecotones story, I’ve written a couple of other stories about the spell growers of Ormenna and the surrounding lands. With each one I write, I see the setting grow richer and inch toward developing it more for a possible novel (or more!). So keep your eyes out for more stories that tie in with these.

A writer, runner, reader, parent, and teacher, Daniel Ausema has had stories and poems in Strange Horizons, Daily Science Fiction, Diabolical Plots, and many other places. His steampunk-fantasy trilogy Spire City is also available. He lives in Colorado, at the foot of the Rockies.


Looking for a holiday gift? Buy You Are Here now and help out desperate animals. While at our low introductory price of $2.99, all proceeds will be donated to the Humane Society.

Available here:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes

Lynn Rushlau

A short interview with another (new and undiscovered) author and contributor to You Are Here – Tales of Cartographic Wonders.

Lynn Rushlau

What inspired you to write a story about a map?

I was reading a book years ago that got into a section on cartographers and where they got their information (afraid I can’t remember what the book was on, but pretty sure it wasn’t just about maps). I’ve always loved maps and that section sent the wheels turning.

Do you have a special place where you go to recharge your creative muse?

Most frequently, I head outdoors. I love walking outside and that always helps whether I’m working through my current work in progress while I walk or just letting my thoughts drift. I’m lucky to have a couple of walking paths near my home with lots of trees and some (artificial) waterfalls.

Can you tell us about a time when you wished you had a map?

A few years ago I flew into Tokyo and was confident I could walk from the train station to my nearby hotel based on the map I looked at online before I left. I didn’t realize there’d be no street signs & was quickly turned around and confused. I wandered the streets, getting more and more lost and frantic before the nicest woman ever stopped and asked if I needed help. She and her mother whipped out their phones and had a battle between Google & Apple Maps. Not sure which we followed, but they actually escorted me several blocks directly to the door of my hotel.

In  your story, Safe Haven, you protagonist reveals a secret ability. What’s your secret talent?

Hmm, don’t think I’ll be admitting to any psychic gifts here. I’ll just say this is the first and only steam punk story I’ve written to date.

Lynn Rushlau graduated from the UT Austin with a degree in Anthropology and minor in Sociology—which seem like awesome planning for a life creating worlds, but she admits she wasn’t thinking that far ahead. She lives in Addison, Texas with two attention-needy cats, and is on Twitter @lrushlau.


Looking for a holiday gift? Buy You Are Here now and help out desperate animals. While at our low introductory price of $2.99, all proceeds will be donated to the Humane Society.

Available here:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes

Kate Coe

 

There are many writers out there; self-publishing their stories and creating fantasical worlds for readers to discover. But finding them can be hard. We like to think that these anthologies help readers discover new-to-them authors. We know we did with Kate Coe! Though she started writing reviews for SFFWorld.com earlier this year, we had no idea she wrote her own fiction as well. We were quite surprised by her imaginative story and hope you will be, too.

Kate Coe

What inspired you to write a story about a map?

I loved the idea of a map not being a piece of paper; a map being something that gives you a trail, a place-marker, a path on which something else runs… maybe life or fate. And somewhere in the Otherworld, in the depths of Fairyland, is there someone who can map out fates?

Do you have a special place where you go to recharge your creative muse?

I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky…although I haven’t sailed for years, the sea winds always recharge me.

Can you tell us about a time when you wished you had a map?

This was a time when we did have a map, but we just didn’t pay enough attention to it! They’re only useful if you actually use them…I was on Dartmoor (a moorland area in the UK) with a group of fellow-teenagers. We were being overly optimistic with our route from one campsite to another, and we somehow went the wrong way. Hey, it happens…except this time, our route took us over some suspiciously marsh ground. The sort that squelches worryingly under your boot. The sort that moves as you step on it. The sort that leaks water into your footprints and you have a cold realisation that you’re walking over a weed-and-bog-covered-lake…we got out of there, very fast, and took our map’s polite warnings of ‘marshy land’ a little more seriously after that!

In  your story, Mapping Out the Future, your spunky protagonist, Ghost, feels as if she’s part of a larger world. Can we expect to see more of her?

Ghost is part of a wider world and story, so if you like her or want to know more about her world – or the nagging feeling that someone was watching her – then keep an eye out!


Kate Coe is a writer of fiction and fantasy, and blogs at writingandcoe.co.uk. She writes the GreenSky series of novellas, is a librarian in real life, and fills her spare time with web design, reading, cross-stitch and DIY (which may or may not involved destroying things).


Buy You Are Here now and help out desperate animals. While at our low introductory price of $2.99, all proceeds will be donated to the Humane Society.

Available here:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes

Andrew Leon Hudson

Today’s featured author has a history with SFFWorld.com and the short story anthologies we put together. He even took over last year’s editing duties to produce Ecotones – Ecological Stories from the Border Between Science Fiction and Fantasy (it’s got award-winning authors in it – go read!).

But this year, he simply helped with story selection and when we begged, offered his own story.

Andrew Leon Hudson

What inspired you to write a story about a map?

I wasn’t, at first. I’ve recently read some great sf that had a strong focus on geo-political issues, but “maps” weren’t really on my radar until the anthology theme was announced. In the end I wrote two completely different map stories, and the one in YOU ARE HERE has inspired me to start some new stories in the same world. So it seems Maps have inspired me to write about other things.

Do you have a special place where you go to recharge your creative muse?

The answer is probably “bed”, I tend to tick over ideas while I’m waiting to fall asleep. For me the bigger challenge is to push aside distractions so I can actually write, so the “special places” for me are where I work. At the moment I hide myself in cafes or bars around my city and make sure I don’t have the WiFi password!

Can you tell us about a time when you wished you had a map?

I’ve rarely got lost, even before I had a smart phone in my pocket. I’m terrible with street names, but I’ve always had a good grasp of my general location: no matter how I arrived some strange part of my city, I can always walk straight home, even if I don’t know where a particular route will lead. However, I used to work a delivery job that meant I was driving all around Yorkshire, and sometimes the destinations seemed to magically slide away from where they were supposed to be…

 


Andrew Leon Hudson is an improper Englishman who writes, edits, designs and publishes books for people, himself included. If you’d like one, drop him a line sometime. He lives in Europe, and plans to spend as much time there as he can before the doors close once and for all. Visit andrewleonhudson.wordpress.com to learn more.


Buy You Are Here now and help out desperate animals. While at our low introductory price of $2.99, all proceeds will be donated to the Humane Society.

Available here:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes

Robert A. Francis

When we chose this year’s map theme, we hadn’t thought it would inspire very many horror stories, but the internet proved us wrong.

Today’s You Are Here featured author decided to map his way to hell. Let’s learn a bit more about why (for pete’s sake!) would anyone want to do that.

Robert A. Francis

What inspired you to write a story about a map?

As a geographer, I work with maps a lot, and am interested in how they link to our geographical imaginations of space and place. I thought an anthology of stories around maps was a great idea, and wanted to explore how realms beyond ours might be mapped, and what is might mean to do so. So I started working on The Final Atlas.

Do you have a special place where you go to recharge your creative muse?

Recharging my muse is a luxury I don’t usually have – I do most of my creative writing longhand on the train to work and type it up in the small hours of the morning – but generally liminal places feed creativity for me, especially riverbanks, beaches and lake shores. The boundary between land and water has great profundity.

Can you tell us about a time when you wished you had a map?

Many times. I seem to get lost in cities I visit all the time and have an appalling sense of direction. Smartphones are a godsend.

Your story evokes a wonderful, and terrifying, sense of place. Was there a specific location the story is set in?

Venzone (where The Final Atlas is set) is a beautiful Italian town that I spent some time in as a doctoral student many years ago. It was knocked down by an earthquake in 1976 and rebuilt in just the same style as before. It is well worth a visit and even has mummies!


Rob Francis is an academic and writer based in London. He has published numerous scientific articles and books, and started writing short fiction in 2014. His stories have appeared in various magazines, including SQ Mag, SpeckLit, Swords & Sorcery Magazine, The Lorelei Signal, The Fable Online and Every Day Fiction.


Buy You Are Here now and help out desperate animals. While at our low introductory price of $2.99, all proceeds will be donated to the Humane Society.

Available here:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Canada
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
iTunes